Yellow Shades Kimono (DIY.pdf)

This lovely yellow naturally dyed jacket is made by my interns. The instruction on how to make the jacket can be bought as download (pdf). All you need as material is old fabrics and clothes and some strong fine cotton or linen yarns like Cottoline or Bio Linen or something that you have already at home. We did wove this jacket on a Cricket Loom but any other loom would be fine too.

Here some background information on the making process.

Work: Shades of Yellow Jacket (made from strips of scrap textile, naturally dyed and handwoven)
By: Interns of Textielfabrique Meilin (21) Sintlucas craftmanship textile, Alexandra (25) Artez MA Practice Held in Common

Size: All Size
Reproduction: Preferably by hand by the new owner

Textielfabrique is the Rotterdam based textile studio of Maaike Gottschal. In this studio we produce hand dyed and hand woven textiles. Our mission is to create awareness about the extremely high potential that textiles can have in our culture. In the past, textiles were an important medium for communicating values, beliefs, prestige and comfort.

The idea behind making the Kimono jacket started with Meilin introducing us to this competition and Maai- ke’s idea using the leftover materials lying around in the studio which was a great potential for creating the Kimono. Using torn leftover materials coming from other clothing and used fabrics has been a priority of the process while emphasising the traditional hand-crafting such as weaving and bringing it into the foreground preserving the potential of crafting in this modern age.

As young artists, our fascination is for textiles and creating in an environmentally friendly manner. At first, the sources used for the Kimono were naturally dyed by Meilin using yellow (marigold, reseda and chamo- mille dyes. Afterward, when the materials were dyed, we, Alexandra and Meilin proceeded with hand-wea- ving. For this process, we both used Cricket loom which is very easy to be used loom for anyone interested in creating own unique textiles.

During the process of natural dyeing, we also developed an inspiration coming from traditional Japanese textile techniques (Sakiori and Saori weaving). Also Its philosophy of creating (Mottainai) has brought a great value and motivation into the making. We also like the idea that people can weave the kimono them selves because it can be easily done by an amateur weaver.

Mottainai (don’t waste)

In Japanese culture, this word is an expression of encouragement to “reduce, recycle, reuse”, and refers to thought patterns that give rise to wasteful action.
This term can be uttered alone as an exclamation when something useful such as food or time, is wasted “What a waste!” or “Don’t waste!”

Among the physical waste (resources) Mottainai is an old Buddhist word, tradition, cultural practice, idea active in Japanese culture, and has also ties with the Shinto idea that
“objects have souls”.

Sakiori (saki = tear) (ori =weave)

Woven from strips of old cloth

Sakiori is a traditional Japanese weaving technique that originally comes from the Northern part of Japan. In the North, the fibre of the textile was a scarce during the Edo Period, therefore recycling became very important. The weaving process was done with torn materials used from worn kimonos, and clothes.

After Sakiori fabric was worn, it was dissembled again to use the wires to make new pieces of the textile. If the textiles wasn’t worth anything anymore, it was burned and used as an insect repellent or in agriculture.

Beschrijving

This lovely yellow naturally dyed jacket you can make yourself. My interns made an instruction for you. The instruction on how to make this jacket can be bought as a downloadable pdf. All you need for material is old fabrics and clothes and some strong fine cotton or linen yarns like Cottoline or Bio Linen or something that you have already at home. We did weave this jacket on a Cricket Loom but any other loom would be fine too.

Here some background information on the making process.

Work: Shades of Yellow Jacket (made from strips of scrap textile, naturally dyed and handwoven)
By: Interns of Textielfabrique Meilin (21) Sintlucas craftmanship textile, Alexandra (25) Artez MA Practice Held in Common
Size: All Size

Reproduction: Preferably by hand by the new owner

The idea behind making the Kimono jacket started with Meilin introducing us to this competition and Maaike’s idea using the leftover materials lying around in the studio which was a great potential for creating the Kimono. Using torn leftover materials coming from other clothing and used fabrics has been a priority of the process while emphasizing the traditional hand-crafting such as weaving and bringing it into the foreground preserving the potential of crafting in this modern age.

As young artists, our fascination is for textiles and creating in an environmentally friendly manner. At first, the sources used for the Kimono were naturally dyed by Meilin using yellow (marigold, reseda, and chamomille) dyes. Afterward, when the materials were dyed, we, Alexandra and Meilin proceeded with handweaving. For this process, we both used a Cricket Loom which is easy to be used loom for anyone interested in creating their own unique textiles.

During the process of natural dyeing, we also developed an inspiration coming from traditional Japanese textile techniques (Sakiori and Saori weaving). The philosophy of creation without making any waste (Mottainai) has brought great value and motivation into the making. We also like the idea that people can weave the kimono themselves because it can be easily done by an amateur weaver.

Mottainai (don’t waste)

In Japanese culture, this word is an expression of encouragement to “reduce, recycle, reuse”, and refers to thought patterns that give rise to wasteful action. This term can be uttered alone as an exclamation when something useful such as food or time, is wasted “What a waste!” or “Don’t waste!”

Among the physical waste (resources) Mottainai is an old word (tradition, cultural practice, idea) that is active in Japanese culture; it clings to the idea that “objects have souls”.

Sakiori (saki = tear) (ori =weave)

Woven from strips of old cloth

Sakiori is a traditional Japanese weaving technique that originally comes from the Northern part of Japan. The textile fibers were scarce (during the Edo Period) and winters long, 

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