Retracing a Hidden Image

March 2018, Rotterdam

How do Things Take Shape, Kasuri 1-4, handwoven linnen twill kasuri.
4 x 35 x 45 cm.
The supplementary weft is woven from a Japanese ball of naturally dyed Kasuri yarn.

During my stay in Japan with the Matsueda family, I received a large ball of ikat yarn as a gift. As an exercise I tried to find out the pattern that was hidden in the ball of yarn.

During the process I came across many different pattern variations, but none of them directly related to a

design. The cube-like pattern from the local Korume style remained characteristic and I used that to continue. The canvases are partly inspired by the later work of Agnes Martin.

A living treasure Mr. Matsueda is a Japanese indigo dyer and kasuri – (Ikat) weaver. The technique used is the Ikat resist technique in which the threads are tied off according to a predetermined pattern. The pattern only becomes visible again when weaving. The entire process of working out a pattern, binding, dyeing and weaving takes an enormous amount of time. My Japanese teacher and Kasuri master Mr. Matsueda makes three 12-meter kasuri fabrics per year. 1 kimono is made of each fabric.

Beschrijving

March 2018, Rotterdam

How do Things Take Shape, Kasuri 1-4, handwoven linnen twill kasuri.
4 x 35 x 45 cm.
The supplementary weft is woven from a Japanese ball of naturally dyed Kasuri yarn.

During my stay in Japan with the Matsueda family, I received a large ball of ikat yarn as a gift. As an exercise I tried to find out the pattern that was hidden in the ball of yarn.

During the process I came across many different pattern variations, but none of them directly related to a 

design. The cube-like pattern from the local Korume style remained characteristic and I used that to continue. The canvases are partly inspired by the later work of Agnes Martin.

A living treasure Mr. Matsueda is a Japanese indigo dyer and kasuri – (Ikat) weaver. The technique used is the Ikat resist technique in which the threads are tied off according to a predetermined pattern. The pattern only becomes visible again when weaving. The entire process of working out a pattern, binding, dyeing and weaving takes an enormous amount of time. My Japanese teacher and Kasuri master Mr. Matsueda makes three 12-meter kasuri fabrics per year. 1 kimono is made of each fabric. 

 

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